Tag Archives: Molotov Pigtails

Beauty advice for job seekers.

Those who know me personally would be aware of the fact that I’m seemingly constantly going into job interviews. It seems like a never ending job hunt, even if I’m currently employed in a regular job outside of my freelancing. The reason? I take life advice from rockstar and business mogul Gene Simmons who states that you should always be looking for work so that you’re never out of work.

The thing that baffles me is that many people in their teens, 20s and 30s seem to have only a vague concept on etiquette for job interviews. This is one of those times when first impressions mean everything, yet I’ve seen people look surprised and hurt after interviewers have commented on their wearing leggings to interviews or with way too much makeup on for a professional environment (the sort of stuff you’d wear out clubbing on a saturday night). Even if you’re applying for roles in the fashion or beauty industry. Hell, even if you’re applying for jobs in fast food, it is general courtesy to look neat, professional and put your best self forward. Turning up looking like you’ve wandered in from a music festival is rude as you’re literally telling the interviewer they weren’t worth the effort it would take to put on something a little more chic when they are most likely wearing corporate wear.

Makeup is one of those factors that can make or break a professional image. Women are generally expected to wear cosmetics in the workplace (the sexism apparent in this is another topic for another day), yet most employers have no clear guidelines as to what that actually entails until you turn up one day and are told you look unprofessional. Prospective employers (again, fashion industry or not) still expect a corporate edge to your presentation as this is a more formal setting than being in your normal work environment. They’re designed to be intimidating to see how you perform under pressure. Here’s a list of a few makeup looks that will suit almost any job interview.

1. 60s revamp

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pictured: Lana Del Rey

The 60s style nod we’ve been seeing on runways and in the streets alike is a great way to look polished very quickly whilst still looking fresh, young and stylish.

– A clean, dewy base is essential for this look, so pay extra attention to colour matching your foundation correctly and buffing it in with a duo fibre brush, beauty blender or your favourite foundation brush.

– Conceal carefully under the eyes and over any blemishes, then powder lightly to eliminate any shine. A very light touch of dusty pink or peach coloured blush will give a nice glow, try to avoid over contouring unless you simply can’t leave the house without contouring. If so, keep it light and well blended so it looks natural. Minimalism is the key here.

– Eye shadows should be left to light, neutral colours and a shadow 1-3 shades darker than your base colour can be swept through the socket with a fluffy blending brush to accentuate the eye more.

– Next, a flick of black liner (note: for those with an unsteady hand, an eyeliner pen will be your best friend here) for a cat like look. Try to keep it close to the lashline and the wing should end fairly close the the outer corner of the eye to avoid the Amy Winehouse look, which is great, but doesn’t scream “hire me” to prospective employers.

– Leave the lower lashline clear of any colour to keep the liner from being overpowering and apply lashings of mascara to both upper and lower lashes.

– Keep your brows neat and avoid over filling them: once you’ve balanced out the shape, you’re done. No gradient shaded looks or waxy cartoon brows here. Better still, play it safe and use a shadow and angle brush to fill them in to avoid going overboard.

– Finish the look with a nude or natural lip colour, like a dusty pink, peach or a light coral colour to keep it fresh and youthful.

2. Completely neutral

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From the Louis Vuitton SS14 campaign.

This is the ultimate safe option for a job where you’re unable to figure out how conservative your prospective employer will be. Natural makeup suits everyone so it’s the best bet if you’re not confident enough (or you have a more androgynous style) for a 60s look or a red lip. A clean, fresh base is essential and special attention needs to be paid to the smaller details so it looks classy and neat instead of like your makeup has rubbed off on the way there.

– A sheer to medium coverage foundation (or BB cream if you’re blessed with clear skin) is going to make this look a lot more eye catching; full coverage foundations can come across as mask-like unless they’re balanced with the same amount of makeup everywhere else. Pick your favourite foundation, ensuring a correct colour match, and buff into the skin like a crazy person.

– Conceal very carefully under the eyes to eliminate darkness without creasing up underneath and adding ten years to your life. Blend thoroughly before concealing any blemishes, pigmentation, etc.

– Apply a light dusting of powder to the entire face to set your foundation without looking cakey or too matte- it will make you look dull and pasty.

– Next, lightly sculpt the face with a matte contouring powder or bronzer (or powder foundation) 1-3 shades darker than your foundation under the cheekbones (the hollow of your cheek, suck them in to find them), sweeping from the temples to the side of the forehead and against the jawline. Use a small fluffy brush for more control if you’re new to this, otherwise a chisel-shaped blush brush (or contour brush, fan brush, etc) will do just fine. You must blend the contouring out correctly- watch your hairline for any pooling bits of colour that haven’t blended in properly. Always contour slightly less than you think you need to so you avoid looking freakish. Matte powders are important for neutral looks as any pearlescent colours will bring light back to these areas, rendering your hard work pointless…. plus it looks completely obvious, which will clash with this look.

– With a medium sized powder brush, apply a natural shade of blush that suits your skintone working from the apples of your cheeks and sweeping up toward the temple. Blend well to avoid the 80s stripes. Even if you can rock them, this isn’t the time to get your Pat Benatar fix.

– Highlight the tops of your cheekbones, under the brow bone and up the centre of your face using a highlighting powder, powder foundation 1-3 shades lighter than your base or even an eyeshadow a few shades lighter than your foundation. Like the contouring, use a small fluffy brush if you need the extra control, otherwise a soft medium powder brush will work just great. Unlike the contouring, you can be a little bit more heavy handed so long as your chosen highlighting product doesn’t shine like a beacon (this will make you look oily instead of glowy and fresh) as it will continue to lift your best features and give a healthy glow to your skin. Can you tell I love highlighting?

– Using the same product you used as a highlighter (or an eyeshadow 1-3 shades lighter than your skin), fill in the centre of your eye using a flat eyeshadow brush, blending lightly at the corners of your eye and socketline.

– Using the same product you used to contour (or an eyeshadow 1-3 shades darker than your skin), create a darker socket/crease line, being sure to stick close to your actual eye socket and blend in well. Use a fluffy brush for this if, like me, you have a tendency towards heavy handed application.

– Invest in a brown eyeliner. Seriously. It will be your best friend on days when you’re hung over, tired, have cried all night or when black liner will look too over done. A gel liner has the added benefit of being near permanent until you decide to remove it yourself.

– Carefully trace this genius shade of eyeliner around your lashline. Be careful not to make the lines too thick, but rest assured that it will still look amazing if you make a slightly bolder line than what you intended to. If it looks too dark, blend with a cotton tip or a bullet brush by lightly buffing over the line in tiny circles until it becomes a soft line. Notice how big your eyes look right now. Much bigger than when you use black eyeliner. Gloat a little and praise your good sense to buy a brown liner. Repeat this process of admiration until you need to move on to the next step.

– Curl your lashes to add more lift to your eyes before finishing with a generous amount of mascara. Comb through any clumps.

– Do not finish with a nude lip. You will probably look washed out like that ridiculously good looking zombie in “Warm Bodies’. Instead, use a soft natural pink or peach which is close to your natural lip colour. Using a lip pencil, fill in your lips before applying lipstick and then trace and perfect the outline after applying lipstick for a perfect shape that won’t bleed.

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Moschino AW14

3. Classic red lipstick

This look can be made in conjunction with either of the two above looks so long as:

a) The eye makeup is played down so it doesn’t compete with the lips for attention
b) You can line lips easily and will remember to bring a lip pencil, emergency concealer and the lipstick with you for a touch up pre interview
c) You don’t eat or drink anything between applying it and the interview if you’re not 100% certain it won’t end up all over your chin, teeth, cheeks, nose etc.

Red lipstick is only job interview appropriate if the rest of your face is soft and understated. If you want to mix it up with the 60s style makeup, make sure your liner is thinner than normal to keep it balanced.

If you have a warm skintone, stick to orange based reds such as NARS heatwave (my old faithful) or Limecrime’s Suedeberry Velvetine. If you have a cool skintone, stick to blue based reds such as MAC Ruby Woo or Limecrime’s Red Velvet Velvetine. If you have dark skin, stick to coral or pink toned reds.

To recap:

– Your base needs to be flawless regardless of the style you’re going for

– Cartoon eyebrows are bad news and do not belong in the workplace.

– Soft neutral colours are your best friends

– Keep black liner to a minimum

– Keep one key focal point

– Minimalism is key

– You really need brown eyeliner.

Any other soft, smoky looks in neutral colours like soft greys, browns and copper will work out great. Dark lipsticks are not recommended for 99.99% of all job interviews, trust me. 

This post is part of a series, so please look forward to more beauty tips for job seekers.

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The 5 Most Annoying Makeup Myths Perpetuated By Instagram and YouTube

As a professional makeup artist, I’ve had clients ask me for bizarre bits of advice which have left me scratching my head. They have usually admitted that they saw a video on YouTube or a picture on instagram instructing them to use certain products in an unconventional way or convincing them that this is how the pros really do things. Having worked in cosmetics retail for a while, I found this maddening as people would request products that don’t actually exist or for purposes that at best would break them out and at worst could be downright dangerous. If a product isn’t tested for or designed to be on certain parts of your face, you are risking your health because of something a random stranger on youtube told you. I ask you, is it really worth it? Most internet beauty “gurus” have no training in this field… part of our training is a health and safety aspect to ensure we don’t blind, burn or otherwise injure our clients. Keep it in mind.

Now without further ado, the most annoying beauty myths perpetuated by instagram and youtube:

1. Concealer contouring.

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(pictured above is the masterful work of Kevyn Aucoin, image from “Making Faces”)

When I was working at a certain cosmetics counter, contouring became a popular beauty trend in a really big way. I had sixteen year old girls, business women, housewives and every kind of ordinary or not so ordinary customer come in to ask me about contouring. Well… sort of.

I had people come in and ask me for “concealer palettes for contouring”. Wait, what? they don’t exist. I would sit them down and explain that every makeup brand has products designed for contouring which would blend with more ease and match their skintone better. I’d let them try them for themselves. Then they’d say “well, on youtube she used concealer….”

Let me explain why this is annoying to someone who makes their living out of makeup. Concealer is just one of many mediums you can use for this technique. Many artists prefer not to use concealer as it is not designed to be blended into the base. Concealers are typically thicker and many are also comedogenic (meaning they block pores) as they’re only designed to sit on top of problem areas, not to blend in flawlessly with your foundation. You are literally breaking yourselves out or looking cake faced because you’re copying a random stranger’s beauty routine. What works for one person may not work for you. For this reason, many brands have cream or liquid highlighting and contouring products or kits. If not, do it the old fashioned way and use a foundation 1-3 shades lighter for highlighting and 1-3 shades darker for contouring. Your skin will thank you and you won’t look cakey. My favourite products for contouring and highlighting are powders as I find them easier to build up naturally and being the last thing going on your base, it will be most prominent.

2. Only bright, colourful eye makeup is “good” eye makeup.

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(image above is work by the amazingly talented Queen of Blending)

Amazing eye makeup like this is extremely eye-catching and definitely shows a mastery in this particular kind of eye makeup, but it’s not a measure on how talented you are within your own skill set. In my opinion, you’re “good” at doing your own makeup if you’re able to disguise areas you are unhappy with and accentuate areas you like; if you’re able to make yourself over in a style that suits your face shape, colouring and personal style. In my opinion, you’re “good” at doing other people’s makeup if you’re able to make somebody over in a way that suits their face shape, colouring, personal style and matches the occasion or criteria you have been given for their makeup. In short, if you’re a whiz with bright, colourful, bold eye makeup with bold, winged liner and dramatic false lashes, you’re good at doing eye makeup. If you can create a clean pin-up look, neutral smokey or minimalist eye makeup without any hassles, you’re good at doing eye makeup. No one style is worth more than another.

3. Brows need to be completely drawn in at all times

A big trend right now is incredibly filled in brows. With bold liner and a more bombastic look, this looks amazing and finishes the look beautifully. However, if you’re a “chuck on some BB cream and a touch of mascara and gloss” type person, it looks unbalanced and focuses unnaturally on the brows, giving more of an “Oscar the Grouch” appearance than a smouldering neat look. A lot of girls also have a habit of using a pencil or shadow that is too dark for their brows which, again, looks fine with a full face of bold makeup, but very OTT for every day looks. Your pencils and powders should ALWAYS be suited for your hair colour (most brands have a blonde, light brown and dark brown) and when it doubt, go for the lighter between two shades.

4. You’re only “good” at makeup if you’re good at artistic looks

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Makeup by the incredible Alex Box for Illamasqua

This image is a fantastic way to demonstrate the ability of one artist. Many people have an ingrained belief that only through creating more artistically driven or high fashion makeup are you “truly” a talented makeup artist or talented as a makeup user or consumer. These styles are used usually in advertising or for high fashion, editorial or runway looks. If you actually look at the runways or editorial shoots in magazines like Vogue, they’re intended to derive a feel for the collection or season rather than to be wearable to the everyday person in an every day situation. If you’re not brave enough to wear an outfit straight off the runway in all its crazy glory, you don’t need to wear makeup that is as over the top either. Nor does it indicate a level of skill. The look below was created by the same artist for the same company and, while it’s still more ornate than a true natural look, it still has the criteria of being “good” makeup, which is that it fills the criteria needed for the occasion, suits the wearer and is applied evenly and blended properly.

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The bottom line? if you’re good at intense fantasy looks, prosthetics or just drama filled looks that consist of your every day style, my hat goes off to you. If you’re good at soft romantic, neutral looks, you’re good at makeup too. If you’re good at pin-up style, dolly style makeup or any other style that makes you feel amazing and look like a million bucks, you’re good at makeup. No more type casting or excluding.

5. EVERYONE needs a super-dooper full coverage foundation to look flawless

This is arguably the most annoying trend of all. No two people have the same type of skin. If you feel more comfortable with a very full coverage because you have a lot of noticeable pigmentation, an oilier skin type, scarring, acne, etc then by all means. However, if you’re relatively young with clear skin and no real problems with oiliness, you have no real reason to actually wear full coverage foundation. If you have mature skin, it is ageing and if you have problem skin, it will accentuate the texture of any blemishes. Most people need a medium coverage or sheer to medium coverage with correct concealing. If you seal it with a light dusting of powder, it will last you all day and there’s no reason to wear more unless you want to. If this is how you feel most comfortable within your own skin, don’t let me correct you. That’s awesome. It’s more important to be happy and personal style is just that. However, if you are simply following the instructions of a friend or a youtuber or buying the products used by a babe on instagram or tumblr, keep in mind that they’re not you. Their skin isn’t the same. Go to a counter, get colour matched and try a finish, texture and coverage that make you look and feel amazing and like you could take on the world or seduce a rockstar with the wink of an eye.

Remember with all of these myths, the main issue is that the makeup buying public are copying single people on mass and defining it as the only way to look or feel good. We are all different and need different things in our lives, whether it’s what we put on our mouths, in our minds or on our faces. Fulfilment is a personal journey that cannot be achieved by jumping on a band wagon.

Now go out and be the best, happiest and most secure person you can be… because you’re an independent woman who don’t need no man.

wait…

Products to watch Jan-April 2014

There are so many exciting products on offer at the moment! whether they’re holiday limited edition collections that are still floating around or products that I’m anxiously awaiting the release of, here’s my list of must have products for this season.

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Riri heart MAC holiday collection– Veluxe Pearlfusion Shadow in 2x Dare
My dear friend Holly gave me this palette as a birthday present (which means I received it 5 days early!!) due to her amazing job at MAC Cosmetics. I am usually more of a matte shadow person because I find the colour payoff usually isn’t as good with pearlescent or glittery shadows or that they tend to crease up after a little wear. I wore this to a rock show lately and was pleasantly surprised with not only the colour payoff, but how absolutely exquisite the colours are. They shine with a multitude of iridescent undertones that change with the light. I am in love with this palette. The only downside? it’s a limited edition only release….

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Clinique A Different Nail Enamel For Sensitive Skins

I don’t know about you guys, but as an infrequent sufferer of eczema, this has on occasion made it difficult to paint my nails. Normally, I would just resign myself to the knowledge that it would be gone in a few days and just leave it alone, but it’s nice to know that for long time sufferers of sensitive skin, there is a nail polish that you can use that won’t flare up any skin conditions or cause an onset of contact dermatitis. Like all Clinique products, you know this has been tested  by a team of dermatologists and this peace of mind alone makes it worth trying. As for the cons, there’s a limited colour choice and I’ve heard mixed reviews about the colour payoff. I’d pick a colour you’re likely to wear often and keep it as a backup if you’re one who suffers from sensitivity.

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Limecrime Velvetines- the Clueless Witch Collection

When I heard this collection was being launched a few days ago, I kind of made this weird strangled noise in the back of my throat. It’s no secret that I LOVE the velvetines range. This new collection, also affectionately referred to as the “gothatines” offers a dark berry red not unlike MAC lipstick in Diva called “wicked”, a deep brown shade called “Salem” and, my favourite, a matte black lip colour, a game changer for the industry. Glossy blacks are available from time to time within various cosmetics companies depending on fashion, otherwise using a gel liner or eye pencil has always been the only real path to a clean black lip. Now we finally have a matte black lip stain for all our sartorial needs. I’m buying ten.

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Limecrime velvetine in Black Velvet.

The new Velvetines range launches in March.

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Clarins 3 dot liner
I saw an advert for this in the Australian Elle magazine about 3 days ago and instantly walked to a Clarins counter to give this product a try. The tip looks odd, like a highlighter with wedges cut out of it, so you expect it to be quite firm and difficult to move… it’s actually very flexible and easily creates a wafer thin line just as it can create a bold, 60s style “come hither” liner. The real feature that makes this product special though, is that it’s three points enable you to wiggle them in between the top lashes to create a tightlined effect without the risk of blinding yourself (it’s fast drying, unlike many liquid liners) or the discomfort of trying to reach a liner brush or eye pencil onto your top waterline in the hopes of making your lashes look thicker and eliminating that annoying little gap of nude looking skin you often find when doing your liner too quickly.

Giveaway reminder

Just a quick reminder that my giveaway ends on Monday, September 3rd.

The winner will receive a free, 90 minute makeup lesson either face to face or via Skype (for those interstate or overseas).

To enter, you must “like” Molotov pigtails on facebook and share the giveaway picture.

You may enter as many times as you please, but the more entries you make, the greater your odds of winning. Winners will be informed via facebook and will be randomly selected.

Thanks and good luck.

Photoshoot with Jess Mm and Mark Hillyer!

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Photography: Mark Hillyer
Model: Jess Mm
Make-up/hairstyling: Molotov Pigtails Hairstyling and Make-up.

This was a really fun shoot to undertake. I initially drew inspiration from Andy Warhol’s iconic portraits of Marilyn Monroe, though what resulted was a little more special.

Jess is an absolutely gorgeous model and very fun and easygoing- in short, amazing to work with. Mark likes to think outside the box. Together, we deviated from the original plans and decided to make this more bubblegum editorial. Something surreal, yet still tangible and identifiable.

The make-up took a ridiculously long time as I had to colour match the contours, highlights and foundation in an airbrush to a bizarre shade of bubblegum. Jess looked sunburnt until the eyeliner was applied near the end of the application. Glamorous. However, she was an extremely good sport as I styled a waist-length wig into a pseudo bob and fiddled with the base colour until it looked right.

Thanks so much to both of you for your extreme patience and creativity that you added to a half-baked concept I brought in to you both.

What do you think of the shots? let me know below.

xx

MOLOTOV PIGTAILS first giveaway!

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GIVEAWAY TIME!! I’m pleased to announce that I will now be offering one-on-one make-up lessons as a service. They will be available in person (as a make-up application with lesson) or on Skype for those living interstate, overseas or just time poor. TO CELEBRATE, I WILL BE GIVING AWAY TWO COMPLIMENTARY HOUR AND A HALF MAKE-UP LESSONS (in person only valid in Melbourne, Australia).

The winners can pick whatever they feel like learning in an hour and a half, whether it’s day to night looks, how to select products and brushes or more in depth looks for cosplay, vintage styling or models wanting to brush up on their skills for photo shoots.

Simply share this post and ‘like’ MOLOTOV PIGTAILS hairstyling and make-up on Facebook to enter. Winners will be randomly selected on September 3rd 2013. Entries will also be available via instagram shortly (@prozacpromqueen) Good luck.

Where have I been? Plus dandy andy

….Well, actually, a few job interviews. My computer has been in and out of repair for the last six odd weeks and I’ve had a few jobs which for various reasons I will not be sharing on my blog.

This Sunday (the 21st of July), I will be working with my good friend Ashley on a Film Noir style short film. She will be styling (major wardrobe envy!) and I’ll have the task of creating beautiful 40s style hair and makeup looks on the actors.

Next Saturday (the 27th of July) I shall be shooting with Mark Hillyer and Jessica M to create some interesting art together. Several looks and I’m posting my inspiration board to Pinterest, so take a peek. However, I can safely say that one main look I’m hoping to acheive is inspired (not a blatant copy! I despise plagiarism!) by Andy Warhol’s iconic portraits of Marilyn Monroe, Deborah Harry and countless other people and inanimate objects he screen printed during his time in The Factory.

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This is very personal to me. Andy Warhol is one of my idols. He created an artistic space for so many people and revolutionised high art by refusing to conform to it… or to create his own brand of high art. I want to be someone who can turn the ordinary into high art and make the already fantastic into tangible, memorable, iconic pieces of artwork. So hopefully I’ll be able to pay homage in a way that I feel is appropriate.

In any case, I’m still alive and will hopefully be posting more often now that I’m -touch wood- using a computer that works once more.

XXX