Tag Archives: hairdressing

Wella stylevision 2016!



Recently, I was fortunate enough to do makeup for Ryan brown from joey scandizzo salons and his entry for the wella stylevision competition. I am pleased to announce that our work was shortlisted to the top 10 nationally and, as a result, we will be going through to the finals to recreate this look again and hopefully onwards to overseas if all goes well.
You can find Ryan’s amazing hair work herehere.

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The beauty industry is for “dumb” people.

So a lot of people seem to think that the beauty industry is for “dumb” people who “couldn’t do anything else with their lives”.
I ask those people if they’ve actually thought about what these jobs entail for a moment.
You need an understanding of biology to understand the structure of the skin, hair, nails etc and the proteins that they’re made out of and what substances will or won’t harm them. You need to understand what will or won’t blind or burn or irritate somebody before you put it on their body. You also need to know what that rash, lump or redness means and if it’s a contaminant that will effect your other clients… Much like a nurse.
You need an understanding of chemistry to understand which chemicals are irritants, how their properties effect the absorption of other compounds and which products will cause reactions amongst each other than can be harmful or helpful. You need to mix dangerous chemicals (especially in hairdressing and beauty) and know how to apply them to someone else’s body without seriously injuring them AND make it have a cosmetic effect.
You need an understanding of colour, both to enhance and to hide different physical afflictions on someone’s body. What will add something more beautiful and what will hide tiredness, a rash, a bruise, acne. What will make someone’s skin look less stressed and more youthful. What will suit different skin tones. What will hide age or illness.
You need an understanding of shapes and symmetry that will rival an architect or an engineer. How to make an optical illusion with things that are part of a physical body and hide perceived flaws to accentuate perceived goodness. You need to be precise with angles to make sure you do this properly… A millimetre is the difference between success and failure.
You need an understanding of psychology. Why someone wants to look a certain way, why someone is hesitant to change their appearance (and often identity or race) or embrace it. You need to understand how to read body language from a stranger and make sure they’re comfortable and listen to stories that you normally wouldn’t hear from someone you’ve just met.
You need to understand business. People will do anything to convince you that your work is worthless when you work eight to ten hour days on your feet. How to price yourself based on both time and materials and travel.
You need to be strong. You’re on your feet while people sit in an office, your arms will ache from having them up at someone else’s face or hair for hours of the day. Your back will be screaming after contorting yourself uncomfortably and your feet will be in agony most of your waking hours.
It’s not an easy job. It’s not a glamorous job either as you spend most of your day touching other people’s bodies and bodily fluids, oils and hair. It’s actually quite gross sometimes, but it is rewarding.
My question for you if, after all this, you still seem to think it’s a job for people of lesser intelligence: why do you allow people who you think are stupid to put things on your skin or eyes or trust them with scissors and volatile chemicals.